FAQ

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Contact a Baron support staff member to discuss product details, troubleshooting and more. Get the most out of your Threat Net System and enjoy instant access to fast and accurate critical weather intelligence. Email support@baronthreatnet.com
Threat Net is a web and tablet weather briefing site, with a companion mobile app, designed to keep people and assets safe. The subscription site includes patented weather data designed to inform and help organizations make decisions ahead of impactful weather conditions.
For use on browsers, we currently support the latest versions of Chrome, Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari, as well as the iPad, running running iOS 8.0 or higher.

If you are using the Baron Threat Net app, you will need either an iPhone running iOS 9.0 or above, or a phone running Android 4.1 (Jellybean) or above.

It's easy to sign up! Simply navigate to www.baronthreatnet.com, and select the industry you are interested in. On the next page you can choose to start a free 14-day trial, sign up for an annual or monthly subscription, or even contact us if you are interested in multi-user licenses.
Once you have your primary account established on www.baronthreatnet.com, search for the Baron Threat Net app on either the App Store (for iOS devices) or Google Play (for Android). Download the app to your smart phone, launch it, and log in with your Baron Threat Net user name and password to access weather data in the app.
Yes. Each subscription is licensed for (2) two devices. If you are need of additional licenses, contact us here.
When Baron Threat Net is in use on a 3G or 4G tablet, it can pinpoint your location on the map.
When Baron Threat Net is in use on a 3G or 4G tablet, it can pinpoint your location on the map. In the upper right corner on the map, GPS coordinates are displayed based on the location of your cursor. Place the cursor over your position, and the coordinates are displayed.
Organization discounts are available. Please email sales@baronthreatnet.com for multi-license subscriptions or special packages.
Alerting can be setup on the Map page of the site. In the upper right corner, there is a "Manage Alert" icon displayed. Click the icon and follow the instructions. Text and email alerts will be sent to your email and cell phone number that is part of your profile.
Currently there is not a manual. However, we are here to help. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at support@baronthreatnet.com.
Support is currently available via email, at support@baronthreatnet.com.
Support is currently available via email at support@baronthreatnet.com. In addition, when you subscribe for an annual subscription, you will receive a training session to help you become familiar with the application, and answer any questions you may have.



To zoom in and out, use the plus or minus buttons on the left side of the map, or you can use the mouse scroll wheel, and you can even pinch to zoom on an iPad or tablet. To pan on the map you can click and drag with your mouse or move your finger over the map on an iPad or tablet. You can also go full screen by using the button with two arrows on the right side of the map.
To use the Telestration tool, first choose the "Telestration" option along the top of the map. Then simply use your mouse or finger to draw on the map.
To use the Distance tool, first choose the "Distance" along the top of the map. Then click on the map where you would like to start measuring from. Next drag your mouse to create a circle and measure the distance radiating from your origin point. The distance tool is great for identifying when lightning strikes are within a certain distance of a critical site.
Click the "Storm Tracking" button, then click and hold the mouse at the spot on the map where you want the storm track to begin, drag the mouse to the spot on the map where you want the track to finish, and release the mouse button. You can then fine-tune the track parameters in the menu that appears.
When either NWS Storm Tracks or Baron Storm Vectors is selected, you will see small boxes with arrows appear on the map if any storms meet the selected criteria. Simply click the small box with the area and the storm track menu will appear with the storm attributes. You can then fine-tune the track parameters in the menus that appear.
Adding a legend is simple. When viewing the Baron Threat Net map, you can add a legend by selecting the "Legends" button along the top of the map. If you have multiple data layers on your map, you can choose the left or right arrows on either side of the active legend to view legends for other active data layers.
When viewing the Baron Threat Net Map, you can query information by first selecting the query interactive tool. You can find this tool along the top of the map and labeled "Point Queries." Once selected you can click on the map to retrieve information. Note that point queries retrieve values for the top layer of data. If you have multiple layers you can rearrange data layers in the "Active Products" tab along the bottom of the map.
  1. Click the "Manage Alerts" icon in the top-right of the screen.
  2. Click "Add New Location".
  3. In the pop-up box, type the address for the location you want to monitor, and click "Find Me". You may need to choose from one or more options.
  4. You can refine the location by editing the address, or dragging the icon to a different point on the map.
  5. Click "Save" to store the location.


Note that this feature is only available in the web browser version of Baron Threat Net.

When viewing the Baron Threat Net map, you can change map units by using the toggle in the upper right hand corner next to your profile image. You can switch between imperial units (ENG) or metric units (MET).

Capturing a screenshot isn't natively supported by Baron Threat Net, but you can download a free tool for PCs and Macs to do this. Learn more and download the tool at www.monosnap.com.

If you're using the iOS app, you can take a screenshot by pressing the home and sleep/wake buttons simultaneously. On Android, most phones will take a screenshot when you hold down the sleep/wake and volume buttons simultaneously.

To show a rotating slideshow view of multiple Baron Threat Net map views and data products, you will need to use either the Chrome or Firefox browsers on your PC or Mac.

For Chrome, download and install the free Tab Slideshow Plus extension, available here.

For Firefox, download and install the free Tab Slideshow extension, available here.


You will be billed for the first month or year as soon as you subscribe, and every month or year after that. If you change your plan in the middle of a billing cycle, you are charged a prorated amount depending on when you changed your plan.
From the Map page, click on your username in the upper right hand corner of the screen to access your user profile page. Then click the Subscription link to access your Subscription Summary. Next, click the Update Billing link, which allows you to change your credit card information and billing address.
No. You will continue to have access to your data until the end of the month in which you cancel your account.
If you have forgotten your password, you can choose the "Have you forgotten your password?" link on the sign-in page. Then enter your login email address and select the "email new password," an email will be sent with your password.
On the billing information page during checkout you'll see a red "Manual Payments" button. Click that and fill in the required fields. We'll contact you directly to complete the process.
Yes, you can change/cancel your subscription through the "Manage Account" menu in Baron Threat Net."
You can review our privacy policy here.
You can review the full set of terms and conditions here.



The sources of weather data are Baron, the National Weather Service and various other industry-leading weather data providers.
For "live" radar products, update times range from 5-15 minutes. For forecast model products, update times are every 6 hours. All products are immediately updated as available.
Data for Baron Threat Net is delivered via the internet. Broadband and cellular connections are compatible.
We currently offer data from Baron's exclusive high-resolution WRF (Weather Research & Forecasting) 5km model.
All of the products exclusive to Baron Threat Net are labeled with a blue "Exclusive" box.
Current conditions are collected from routine aviation weather reports, called METARs. These reports are issued every half-hour or hour, and describe different types of weather data observed at an airport at specific times. The data provided from METARs is highly standardized and is considered official by the National Weather Service. In Baron Threat Net, you can query a Current Condition site to see current measurements for temperature, "feels like" temperature, dew point, wind speed and direction, sky conditions, and visibility.
The Current Wind Speed product is a quality-controlled depiction of the current wind speed above 10 mph. In Baron Threat Net, you can quickly query the data layer to see what the wind speeds are around your community.
The ENTLN (Earth Networks Total Lightning Networks) Lightning data displays real-time lightning strikes. The lightning data is pinpoint accurate, so it's easy to see what is at risk in your community. Note that data appears as strikes occur, and large groups of strikes appear as smaller clusters, as you zoom in you will see individual strikes at street level. A few notes about this data:
  • Lightning data is pinpoint-accurate. When the map is zoomed out, a group of strikes will be presented as a smaller cluster. Zoom in to see individual strikes at street-level.
  • The data is displayed in real-time as strikes occur.
  • White lightning icons indicate a positive strike, which is the more destructive type. Yellow icons indicate a negative strike.
  • Click a lightning icon to see the intensity of the strike. For positive the strikes, the higher the value, the stronger the strike. For negative strikes, a larger negative value (e.g., -25) is stronger than a smaller value (e.g., -5).
  • The size of each icon is based on its intensity. The higher the intensity number or the larger the icon, the more powerful the strike.
The Visibility/Fog product uses observations to depict areas of visibility of 1 mile or less. You can use the query tool in combination with this data to see what the visibility (1-mile, .5-mile and .25-mile) is in your community, such as areas of fog along critical roadways.
Watches & Warnings are issued by the National Weather Service (NWS). These products help to keep everyone informed on possible weather risks. Watches are a heads up when it comes to critical weather, and are issued when conditions are favorable for certain types of conditions.

Warnings, on the other hand, are issued when severe weather is likely occurring. It's common for communities to have multiple watches & warnings simultaneously, but by using the query tool in Baron Threat Net, it's easy to click on a community and get a list of all active Watches & Warnings and their details.
Baron Road Conditions is a patented product that depicts real-time pavement-level road conditions. The product displays areas of roads that are flooded, slippery, patchy ice, ice, snow, and heavy snow. It's easy to query road conditions to help communities visualize areas of hazardous roadways.
The Storm Prediction Center's (SPC) Outlooks display the likelihood of severe weather across the U.S. The SPC Day 1 product is great for seeing if your community is at risk for severe weather over the next 24 hours. Risk for severe storms is displayed on the map in 6 categories (General, Marginal, Slight, Enhanced, Moderate and High), and can be queried.
The Storm Prediction Center's (SPC) Outlooks display the likelihood of severe weather across the U.S. The SPC Tornado Day 1 product is great for seeing if your community is at risk for tornadoes over the next 24 hours. Tornado risk is depicted as a probability and you are also able to query it interactively.
The Storm Prediction Center's (SPC) Outlooks display the likelihood of severe weather across the U.S. The SPC Wind Day 1 product is great for seeing if your community is at risk for wind speeds greater than 50 knots (57 mph) over the next 24 hours. Wind risk is depicted as a probability and you are also able to query it interactively.
The Storm Prediction Center's (SPC) Outlooks display the likelihood of severe weather across the U.S. The SPC Day 2 product is great for seeing if your community is at risk for severe weather for the following 24 hours (day after tomorrow). Risk for severe storms is displayed on the map in 6 categories (General, Marginal, Slight, Enhanced, Moderate, and High) and you are able to query it interactively.
The Storm Prediction Center's (SPC) Outlooks display the likelihood of severe weather across the U.S. The SPC Day 2 product is great for seeing if your community is at risk for severe weather in 3 days (two days after tomorrow). Risk for severe storms is displayed on the map in 6 categories (General, Marginal, Slight, Enhanced, Moderate, and High) and you are able to query it interactively.
The Surface Temperature product is based on current observations and depicts the temperature at ground level across the U.S. It's easy to stay local by using the query tool to get current temperatures anywhere in your community.
The High-Res Radar takes all of the NEXRAD radars within the U.S. and compiles them into one image (mosaic). It is updated every 5 minutes, and displays areas of rain, snow, and mixed precipitation. This product eliminates the data cutoff that single-site radars experience, so it is great to use in communities that are covered by multiple radars.
The 24-Hour Rainfall Accumulation product estimates the amount of liquid precipitation via radar, and totals it up for the last 24 hours. In locations that have experienced significant precipitation over the last day, it's simple to take detailed look of who received the most and may have flooding issues.
Baron's Future Radar lets you stay ahead of oncoming storms. Using Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) algorithms, this product allows you to see a radar forecast of storms up to an hour in advance. Use future radar with manual storm cones to estimate arrival times, and communities that may be impacted.
NWS Storm Tracks are best viewed on top of radar products such as the Hi-Res Radar. NWS Storm Tracks are issued by the National Weather Service to note areas of severe weather and their forecasted tracks. These markers originate from the center of a storm (not necessarily the most intense part). They are color-coded based on the type of storm they are (Pink – Tornado Vortex Signature, Purple – Mesocyclone, Navy – Severe Hail, Blue – Hail, Grey – Storm). If you click on a NWS Storm track you can see more details, such as its projected path, what communities are at risk, and the estimated arrival time for those communities. There are five types of NWS storm tracks. Each indicates a different type of weather threat:
  • TVS – Tornado Vortex Signature, indicated by a pink storm track, means that an intense concentrated rotation in an area of a storm has been detected. This indicates an increased probability of a tornado.
  • Meso – This purple storm track indicates a region of rotation, typically around 2-6 miles in diameter that has been detected within a storm.
  • Severe Hail – Dark blue storm tracks indicate that possible hail has developed within a storm that is 3/4 inch or larger in diameter.
  • Hail – A light blue storm track indicates that possible hail has developed within an area of the storm that is more than pea size in diameter.
  • Storm – Grey storm tracks indicate a disturbed state of the atmosphere ranging in scale from tornadoes and thunderstorms to tropical cyclones to synoptic-scale extratropical cyclones. These are generally weaker storms than what you see with other NWS storm tracks.
The Super-Res Reflectivity is the highest resolution data from every single-site radar in the U.S. It is updated every 2 to 12 minutes, and is helpful if you want to focus on weather information from a single radar site at a time.
Based on Baron's exclusive severe weather processing algorithms, these color-coded arrows show the speed and direction of severe weather, like high winds, hail and possible tornadoes. The storm vector originates from the actual threat location (not the center of the storm like NWS Storm Tracks). Click a Vector to get a detailed breakdown of expected conditions. With the slider, you can project a storm cell's movement up to an hour in advance. There are five types of Baron storm vectors. Each indicates a different type of weather threat:
  • Tornado Likely – This bright red flashing storm vector indicates that there is rotation in the storm and there is a likelihood of the storm to produce a tornado near the location of the storm vector at any moment.
  • Tornado Possible – A dark red storm vector means that the storm is strong enough that it could possibly produce a tornado near the location of the storm vector at any moment.
  • High Winds – Yellow storm vectors mean damaging winds of at least 60 mph have been detected within a given area of the storm.
  • Extreme Hail – This dark blue storm vector means possible damaging hail, estimated to be at least 2 inches in size or larger, has been detected within a storm.
  • Hail – Blue storm vectors mean that possible hail, estimated to be at least 3/4 inch in size, has been detected in an area of a storm.
The Velocity product originates from single-site radars, and is a depiction of wind that is moving towards and away from a radar location. This product is helpful for identifying areas of rotation such as tornadoes. Velocity data can at times be difficult to read, so if you have an area of question for tornados, refer to other products such as Baron's Critical Weather Indicators or NWS Watches & Warnings.
This product shows the areas of wind shear for locating both rotating storms and strong winds. Areas designated in light green to brown to yellow and orange showing increasing wind shear. The data resolution is 256 meters and contains 256 colors. It is updated every 5 minutes.
Severe Threats help you to dissect information from a single site radar. The product breaks down radar information into 3 types of threats. Areas of red, white, and black identify areas of probably damaging wind. Purple locations signify areas that could be seeing hail. Flooding is noted as green areas. Severe Threats are great to use in tandem with queries, as well as manual storm cones to see what communities are at risk.
Satellite imagery is available in either visible or infrared, and gives an accurate depiction of cloud cover globally or only over North America. Visible imagery is only available during the daylight hours, and infrared is available at all times.
The Forecast Temperature product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of temperatures for every hour over the next 4 days. You can animate it through time, as well as use a query to get information for specific locations.
The Dew Point product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of dew points for every hour over the next 4 days. You can animate it through time, as well as use a query to get information for specific locations.
The US Forecast Precipitation product is a precipitation forecast that identifies areas of rain, mix, and snow over the next few days. Animate through time to see what communities will see the heaviest precipitation, certain types of precipitation, or query to see potential intensity.
The Accumulated Precipitation product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of the total amount of liquid precipitation that is expected over the next 4 days. Using point queries and animating through time is a great way to identify communities with a flood risk. Do note that this is only a depiction of liquid precipitation, so during winter months it is not accurate for snow accumulation information.
The Wind product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of the wind direction that is expected over the next 4 days. You can animate through time, and it works great with the Wind Speed product.
The Accumulated Snow product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of the total amount of snow that is expected over the next 4 days. Using point queries and animating through time is a great way to identify communities who are expecting the most snow.
The Wind Speed product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of the wind speed that is expected over the next 4 days. You can animate through time, and it works great with the Wind product.
The Cloud Cover product is produced by the Baron Model and is a forecast of cloud cover that is expected over the next 4 days. You can animate through time, and can query to see what percentage of cloud cover is expected.
Buoy data comes from a network of fresh and salt-water sites, and collect data such as sea surface temperature, wind speed, wave height, and more. This can be helpful when in need for coastal information. Do note that not all buoys collect the same measurements, so query information can vary from buoy to buoy.
Sea Surface Temperatures display water surface temperatures for large fresh waterways and oceans. Use the query tool to see what the temperature is at a certain location.
The Wave Height product is based on proprietary data, and displays the wave height conditions for great lake, coastal, and offshore locations. Use the query tool to see what the wave heights are near you.
Marine Zone products are issued by the National Weather Service (NWS), and are the official forecast for great lake, coastal, and offshore locations. You can use the query tool to see active marine zone products as well as the details of each.
The Tropical Track product is generated by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and is the official forecast for a tropical system. It is also known as the "Cone of Uncertainty" and depicts the potential track of the center of the storm. Keep in mind that even if a community is outside of the cone it can still be at risk for tropical threats. You can get more details by clicking on the track to view information such as forecasted category, wind speeds, and timing.
Hurricane Hunter data comes from US Air Force flights that take measurements inside tropical systems. You can see details of the flight observations by clicking on the track.
The Tropical Track forecast product shows a variety of tropical storm models. These are often referred to as "Spaghetti Plots," and are a great way to see how forecasts are agreeing or disagreeing. If you are looking for the official forecast, use the Tropical Track product.
The Baron Tornado Index (BTI) gives you with a simple 1-10 ranking on the likelihood of tornadic development. The higher the ranking, the greater the probability. A BTI value is provided with every Baron Storm Vector. To access this information, click a Baron Storm Vector. The BTI ranking will be posted near the top of the storm information box that appears.